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Walking the Deer Trails

March 17, 2014

It’s Monday and I can’t complain about how the day is going. Still, I wish I was here instead, walking the deer trails along Sand Creek with Cesar. Most times, I’m with V. or the kids. This time, a solo trek + dog.

Cesar scares most of the wildlife away, but I love watching him jump, meander, sniff, run and swim.

There is less time for woods-walking once summer begins, so hoping to get lots of exploring in before then.

Deer Trails and Cesar

Prairie Snow

February 10, 2014

Prairie Snow

 

Pretty. Cold. Soft. Quiet.

Good Morning

December 24, 2013

Winter Morning

Winter Morning

Rusty Fall Prairie

October 31, 2013

My part of Kansas doesn’t have native trees with fire-red leaves, but we do have native grass that turns wispy and rusty as it waits for snow.

Prairie hay

There have been a lot of changes since we took a first look inside the wheat plant stem on May 3.

The plant now reaches about 34 inches from the ground to its tip. The seed head is fully developed, but the kernels are still soft. The kernels are now “filling” or reaching maturity. Rain is still important because it influences the weight of each kernel.

We get paid on the number of bushels. Bushels are figured by weight and the average bushel of wheat weighs 60 pounds. The cash price for wheat this morning is $7.30 per bushel. Our yield will be the true indicator of the effect of the late freezes.

You can see how the plants are losing their green color as they complete the life cycle. The kernels will harden and the plant will turn golden as it dries down, or essentially, dies.

We begin harvest when we’re sure that the seed kernel is dry enough. Kernels that are too wet would eventually spoil. So, the grain companies that receive the wheat have set limits on moisture content.

Take a look at month 8. Next month: Harvest!

Winter Wheat, May 2013

Winter Wheat, May 2013

Winter Wheat Field, May 2013

Winter Wheat Field, May 2013

 

Moved Away is an accidental series about forgotten farmsteads and rural homes.

"The Old Kohler Place," South of Cheney, Kan.

“The Old Kohler Place,” South of Cheney, Kan.

Good news, we think. The temperatures didn’t go below 29 degrees last night. That’s a little buffer above the 24-degree mark, where K-State Extension says the real damage occurs at this stage. Plus, the freezing rain was more moisture.

The frozen wheat of yesterday looks a more cheery version of crystallized this morning. Here’s a view from across the road.

Winter Wheat Field, April 2013

Winter Wheat Field, April 2013

Winter Wheat, April 2013

Winter Wheat, April 2013

 

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