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Wordless Wednesday: Cabbages

December 18, 2013

Third-generation vegetable farm in New York.

Third-generation vegetable farm in New York.

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For at least the next generation, our corner of the country is insulated from a population growth trend called megaregions. The smart people at a project called America 2050 define a megaregion as “multiple, adjacent metropolitan areas connected by overlapping commuting patterns, business travel, environmental landscapes and watersheds, linked economies and social networks.”

The U.S. is expected to have 11 megaregions by the year 2050. The Great Lakes megaregion, for example, will include the cities of Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Pittsburgh and St. Louis. This megaregion is expected to experience a 28.3% growth in population by 2050. The Texas Triangle is another megaregion and includes the cities of Austin, Dallas/Fort Worth, Houston and San Antonio. About 70% of the Texas population is expected to live in this region by 2050.

The U.S. will include 11 megaregions by 2050.

The U.S. will include 11 megaregions by 2050.

Our farm is about 30 miles south of the green circle in the middle of the map, Wichita, Kan. — not yet a megaregion, but still an area to watch. Maybe two generations from now that green circle will become another megaregion, connected to the Kansas City area. That’s OK with us. That development is north and we’re south.

Don’t get me wrong. I think these megaregions offer lots of opportunities, especially for employment, mass transit and more. I just want to be on the outside looking in.

Three Years Ago Today

November 19, 2012

Three years ago today, I started blogging. I thought I’d better share something insightful about what I’ve learned, how I’ve grown, or what’s ahead for this blog.

Sorry everyone. Maybe I’m not feeling insightful. Or, maybe this blog is simpler than that, just stories and thoughts, sometimes random.

I’m indebted to the inventor of blogging (need to find out who that is) for providing a format that’s become my favorite. A fiction writer I’m not and I gave up personal diaries after high school. And, I’m indebted to you for reading. It keeps me motivated to know someone will read.

Over the past three years, here’s the post that generated the most views: https://lynnwoolf.wordpress.com/2011/04/14/restoration-historic-stone-house-barn/

Here is one of my least read posts: https://lynnwoolf.wordpress.com/2010/04/29/butterflying/

And, here’s the post that led to the most exploration around my blog: https://lynnwoolf.wordpress.com/2012/02/22/kansas-wind-2-cattle-shed-0/

Today, my anniversary post shows one of my favorite places: Walking with Cesar along our country road. Here’s to another year of blogging.

Country walking with Cesar.

Martha’s Gate

June 30, 2012

Martha’s Gate is on highway 77 in Dickson County, Kansas. I often drive by, but stopped this time to admire Martha’s pasture and cows.

I hope Martha is around the next time I drive by. I’d like to meet her — and compliment her on her beautiful piece of country.

Annie and Belle

Moved Away is an accidental series about forgotten farmsteads and rural homes.

This one-room Nebraska schoolhouse is another disintegrating rural landmark. However, the spring sunshine seemed to lift it the day I drove by — and stopped to wonder about its former students and teachers. It is at the corner of 721 Road and Highway 75 in southern Nebraska.

Nebraska one-room schoolhouse

Honey Creek School, Beloit, Kansas

Honey Creek School

Honey Creek School

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